Overview

Description

A January thaw broght water droplets shining to the ends of twigs. Mosses and lichens softened in the warmth. Animal tracks snuck off into the fog.

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Elevation

Details

Created by: CNHM
Distance: 1.4 mi
Ascent: 38 ft
Date: 06/03/2017
Duration: 96 min
Descent: 774 ft
Difficulty: Beginner

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Points of Interest

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This common greenshield lichen is seen frequently on tree trunks. “Lichens master the cold months through the paradox of surrender.” observed David George Haskell in his wonderful book “The...
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Northwoods lichens can be diverse, especially in undisturbed forests. A fun game is to pick up a stick and count how many different types of lichens you can see. You don't have to know what they are, you can tell they are different just by their colors and shapes.
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Someone's dog made perfect prints in the soft snow.
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Snowshoe hares travel the same routes over and over. These well-known "runs" provide them with an easy escape route in case of danger. Their tracks may seem backwards -- the larger hind feet mark the direction of travel.
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Ruffed grouse have little snowshoe projections on their sides of their toes that help them stay afloat on the snow. Their dainty tracks are fun to follow.
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"Most people are aware of the beauty of summer flowers and often bemoan their passing as winter approaches. This need not be a cause for regret because, while much color may be lost, there continue...
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Speckled alder buds and catkins are formed and ready for spring.
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On these warm days, sunshine has begun heat the trunks of trees a melt a well in the snow around their base.
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Woodpeckers have been shredding the bark on this dead aspen. There must be tasty insects inside!
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A red squirrel sat here and dismanteled pine cones to get at the seeds inside. This little pile of refuse is known as a midden.
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Fomes fomentarius (commonly known as the tinder fungus, false tinder fungus, hoof fungus, tinder conk, tinder polypore or ice man fungus) is a species of fungal plant pathogen found in Europe, Asia,...
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The bog boardwalk is a magical place no matter what the weather.
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White pines are not wetland species, but they often find a little dry hummock in a bog where they can survive for years. This particular one does not seem to be doing well, but the chartruse of is dying needles is a welcome bright spot on the foggy day.
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Tamarack trees are the only deciduous conifer in Wisconsin. This means that although they have needles and cones like most everygreens, they lose their needle-like leaves in the winter. A new cluster of delicate needles will grow from each warty knob in the spring.
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Labrador tea survives the harsh, windswept bog by wearing a bright orange winter coat. The fuzz under its leaves provides a boundary layer to keep cold, dry air out as the plant takes in carbon dioxide fr photosynthesis.
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Like lichens, mosses dry up and go dormant in adverse weather. With the damp, above freezing days, though it softens, brightens, and begins a slow process of photosynthesis.
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"Most people are aware of the beauty of summer flowers and often bemoan their passing as winter approaches. This need not be a cause for regret because, while much color may be lost, there continue...
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Ruffed grouse eat mostly tree buds in the winter. Their scat ends up looking like pellets of sawdust dipped in white urea.
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White pine needles capture water droplets and spider webs on this unusually warm winter day.
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Sweetfern twigs stick up out of the snow. Crush a leaf in your fingers for a fragrant treat.
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“Lichens master the cold months through the paradox of surrender.” observed David George Haskell in his wonderful book “The Forest Unseen.” Lichens don’t fight the cold, dry, winter air....
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The short, paired needles on the non-native Scots Pine tree near the trailhead capture sparkling drops of fog.
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Always majestic, this old white pine becomes more regal with a foggy mantle.
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A January Thaw made for a pleasant hike, and some unusual sightinings -- like liquid water!